Latest Hoi An Blogs & Articles

Hoi An Overview

Hoi An Overview

In the history, Hoi An used to be a busy harbor a commercial center on the bank of Thu Bon River. It was also the meeting point of many cultures such as Vietnamese, Champa, Portuguese, Japanese and Chinese. As a result, Hoi An is a rich land in terms of history, culture, commerce as well as architecture. It is a must-see for travelers on their trip to Vietnam.What to see and what to do in Hoi An?Hoi An is as gorgeous and charming as an old picture. Hoi An owns the beauty of Western, as well as Eastern architecture. Roaming around Hoi An Ancient Town, you may feel very peaceful like walking in the ancient world where there’s no car, gases and noise of vehicles. Here still remain many old structures, temples, pagodas and ancient homes. Each of them has unique and impressive beauty. The most outstanding attractions of Hoi An are Hoi An Ancient Town, Hoi An Riverside, Bridge Temple (Chua Cau), Thu Bon River,  Cua Dai Beach, Hoi An Museum of History & Culture,  Fujian Assembly Hall, Hoi An Museum of Trade Ceramics and Chuc Thanh Pagoda.Despite being an ancient and quiet town, there are a lot of exciting activities for tourists. You might enjoy a walking tour or a cyclo tour around the ancient town, swimming in Cua Dai Beach or taking a short cruise tour in Thu Bon River.Especially, Hoi An is a commercial town so there are a lot of stores, shops and souvenirs for you to go shopping. Here you can buy gifts for family members and friends or have your outfits sewn by skillful and famous tailors in Hoi An. Last but not least, on the 15th day of every lunar month, you will have chance witness lantern festival on Thu Bon River of people in Hoi An.Click on the link to see The best things to do in Hoi An.What to eat and drink in Hoi An?As the meeting point of different cultures, Hoi An’s specialties is also under the influence of Chinese, French and Japanese but still keep the characteristic of Vietnamese’s food.Going through the streets in ancient towns of Hoi An, there are a lot of street food stalls that worth tasting. The most famous specialties in Hoi An are Cao Lau (Rice Noodles With Barbecued Pork, Greens And Croutons) at Thanh Cao Lau (26 Thai Phien Street, Com ga Ba Buoi (Chicken Rice) on 22 Phan Chau Trinh Str., Banh My Phuong (Vietnamese Baguette with roasted pork, fried fish, boiled sausages, meatballs, boiled chicken or fried egg) on 2B Phan Chau Trinh Str., Banh Bao Vac (White Rose Dumplings) at Hoa Hong Trang (White Rose) on Hai Ba Trung Str., Banh Xeo (Crispy Pancake) at Gieng Ba Le on 47/51 Tran Hung Dao Str., etc.Besides, there are a lot of bar and clubs at night in Hoi An. Beers, wine and tequila are all within your reach. When to visit Hoi An?The best time to visit Hoi An is from February to April. During these months, the weather becomes cooler, humid and less rainy. This time we will have the warm sunshine. From June to August can be not so good time because it gets extremely hot and sunny. Even the locals feel uncomfortable with the high temperature.  From October to November is the rainy season so it may flood also.

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Most Attractive Things To Do in Hoi An

Most Attractive Things To Do in Hoi An

Walking around the Ancient town at night, enjoying Cao Lau, relaxing at the beach, or discovering Hoi An on the full moon day... are unforgettable experiences when traveling to Hoi An. Visiting the land that used to be "the most prosperous trading port in Southeast Asia". If you have the opportunity to visit Hoi An, please refer to some suggestions below to get a deeper feel for the life and people here. 1. Walk around the Ancient town at night A very simple experience, visitors just need to step out into the street and see the old houses, the lantern streets are brilliant at night. You will feel like you are lost in a gala of lights, a picture that combines the calmness of ancient architecture with rustic images and the bustle of modern life. Perhaps the most beautiful is still the banks of Hoai River, where bright streaks of color sparkle on the water. Hoi An is even more beautiful when there are no tourists and shops, then the old town really takes on an old, quiet shape. Walking around the Ancient town at night 2. Enjoy Cao Lau (Hoi An vermicelli) Cao Lau is a specialty dish of Hoi An that anyone coming here should try. The origin of the name of this dish is quite interesting. In the past, when traders came to Hoi An to trade, they had to enjoy this dish on the "high floor" to be able to look after the goods. Since then, this dish has been named Cao Lau. Cao Lau (Hoi An vermicelli) A bowl of Cao Lau Hoi An is a combination of yellow noodles with shrimp, pork and raw vegetables. Its special feature is that yellow noodles are mixed with ashes of Melaleuca firewood from Cu Lao Cham. This typical Vietnamese dish contributes to the culinary soul of Hoi An town. Therefore, you should not miss this dish when coming to Hoi An. Visitors can enjoy this dish at Ba Be restaurant located at the beginning of lane 69 Phan Chau Trinh, or at the Hat shop at the intersection of Tran Phu with Hoang Dieu. In addition, restaurants for foreigners along Bach Dang street also serve Cao Lau. 3. Sip a Cup of Coffee Hoi An has many cafes that are very crowded in the morning, especially Ms. Thao's shop located right around the bend from the Japanese bridge to Bach Dang street, the guests here are mainly young people. Across the bridge is a shop for middle-aged people. Sitting at both shops, tourists can enjoy the view of Hoai riverbank, fishing scene and An Hoi street. Fresh mornings before motor vehicle ban, sitting and drinking a cup of coffee after eating Phuong bread is a gentle way to start a new day in the Ancient town. Sip a Cup of Coffee Also in some other cafes, they even roast Vietnamese coffee beans themselves to make its taste more special and memorable. If you're interested, the staff will explain how they source and roast their coffee and their different brewing methods. It will be your pleasant experience when enjoying a cup brewed in a traditional stainless steel filter called “phin”. 4. Go Shopping at Hoi An Night Market and Central Market Walking around Hoi An night market is an activity that you should not miss. Hoi An Night Market and Central Market are different in character and layout, so they will give you a different shopping experience. Central Market, the largest market in Hoi An, is always busy day and night, with busy streets surrounding the market. Hoi An Night Market is the noisiest area of Hoi An with many restaurants and bars. This place is distinguished by the colorful lights of several shops selling lanterns everywhere. In these markets you can find the same fruits, vegetables, seafood, meat and other essential items. Hoi An Night Market 5. Snorkeling to see coral in Cu Lao Cham Cu Lao Cham Island is about 15 km from the Ancient town, and is one of the places that should not be missed when traveling to Hoi An. Tourism services in this island have not yet developed, but perhaps because of that, Cu Lao Cham still retains its wild features. Coming here, you will experience, and explore the service of scuba diving to see corals, make campfires, sleep at local people's houses, and enjoy fresh - “delicious - nutritious - cheap” seafood. Cu Lao Cham 6. Boat trip on Thu Bon River If you want to explore the town in a different way, instead of cycling around like most other tourists, Hoi An offers you plenty of opportunities to explore it on a boat. The boat trip usually takes an hour or two to travel along the Thu Bon River. You will sit on a boat to row with locals or tour guides on small rivers and canals. If you don't know how to paddle, don't worry, they will show you. Boat trip on Thu Bon River This activity helps you not only enjoy the poetic scenery of Hoi An but also learn about the unique cultural features. The boat trip is more interesting than you might expect as you will participate in other activities in Hoi An such as catching fish and getting to know the normal life of the locals here. 7. Relax at the Beach Hoi An owns many famous beaches in the world. Among them, outstanding are Cua Dai and An Bang beaches with golden sand-covered beaches, spectacular palm trees and turquoise blue waters, these beaches are ideal places to spend a day relaxing or sightseeing. participate in some recreational activities such as swimming, sunbathing and other water sports. Cua Dai Beach Visitors can drop their souls at a beach without umbrellas, tables and chairs, only waves, clear water, bask in the bright sunshine, read a book, enjoy a glass of light wine, or drink a few bottles of cold beer,... Especially on summer days, this is a must-see in any Hoi An tour so that visitors can enjoy the beautiful East Sea view and cool off. Click on the links to see our best tour to Hoi An: Authentic Vietnam Itinerary 2 Weeks , Highlights Of Vietnam Holiday Package , Vietnam Grand Discovery , Luxury Tour Discover Beauty Of Vietnam , Best Vietnam Tour – Beach Holiday 8. Eat Hoi An Bread After enjoying 15 banh mi at various shops across Vietnam, David Farley - a reporter for the BBC specializing in travel and food, commented that "Vietnamese banh mi is the most magical in the world" in the article "Is Vietnamese bread the best sandwich in the world?". Among them is Hoi An bread. Hoi An Bread Hoi An has many famous bread shops for foreign tourists such as Madam Khanh bread (Tran Cao Van), Phuong bread (Phan Chau Trinh) and Ba Lanh bread (Cua Dai). Hoi An bread with slices of pork, pate, cucumber, herbs and signature meat sauce is extremely delicious and attractive. Hoi An bread is crispy on the outside, soft on the inside. you cannot find this flavor anywhere other than Hoi An.  9. Visit Tan Ky Old House Located at 101 Nguyen Thai Hoc, built nearly 200 years ago, Tan Ky old house can be considered as the oldest old house in Hoi An. It is considered a fine example of an 18th-century merchant's residence in this large trading port town. It can be seen that the ingenious combination of 3 architectural styles in this house is Vietnamese, Japanese and Chinese styles. The house is built from traditional materials such as wood, brick and stone purchased from different provinces in Vietnam. Tan Ky Communal House is a special communal house that has welcomed the leaders of Vietnam and international countries to visit. Tan Ky Old House 10. Hoi An’s Japanese Covered Bridge Hoi An’s Japanese Covered Bridge, built in the 18th century, is one of the most iconic sights in Hoi An. This is a beautiful historical work of Japanese architecture featuring sculptures of two dogs and two monkeys (the Chinese years in which many Japanese Emperors were born). It is about 60 feet long, painted a colorful red with a wooden pagoda roof. You can find the bridge at the west end of Tran Phu Street, easily accessible from the town center.Japanese Covered Bridge 11. Visit Quan Cong Temple The temple is named after a loyal general of ancient China - Quan Cong. The temple is a striking sight with its red, yellow and blue colors, attracting a lot of domestic and foreign tourists. It is surrounded by brick walls, and wooden pillars. The roof is composed of horizontal and vertical bars arranged in a complex manner. Visiting this place, you have the opportunity to admire the sophisticated and beautiful decoration and feel the solemnity inherent in Asian worship spaces. Quan Cong Temple 12. Take a cooking class For food lovers, taking a cooking class where you can learn to cook and taste traditional Vietnamese dishes is a great idea. Currently in Hoi An there are many cooking classes that teach Vietnamese and Hoi An dishes, from simple to complex, to suit your preferences. Classes usually begin with a morning walk to the market to purchase the necessary ingredients. You will then enter a small and intimate kitchen to learn how to cook traditional dishes. After class, you can enjoy your own creations. Take a cooking class 13. Discover the Fujian Assembly Hall As a symbol of Hoi An architecture, the Fujian Assembly Hall is famous as a masterpiece of great historical importance. It was created as a place where people from Fujian in China could meet and socialize while living or visiting Hoi An. To see the hall at its fullest, you should visit it during a Chinese festival. It's well worth your time to admire the artwork, pictures and animal statues, as well as Thien Hau Temple dedicated to Thien Hau, the goddess of the sea and also the caretaker of sailors. Fujian Assembly Hall 14. Discover Hoi An on the full moon day If you come to Hoi An on the right day of the Full Moon Festival (lunar day 14), you are really a lucky person. On this day, the ancient town of Hoi An turns off all the electric lights and instead hangs up brilliant lanterns, releasing bright lanterns on the riverbanks. It is a great space for those who love the quiet and peaceful beauty of Hoi An ancient town. Full Moon Festival In addition to the full moon day, visitors can come to Hoi An on other special days such as Vu Lan festival, Thien Hau festival, Mid-Autumn festival, Tet Nguyen Tieu... to immerse in the unique cultural beauty of the land. This. Hoi An ancient town is small, but to understand it, you will need a lot of time. If you have the opportunity to visit Hoi An, try to explore the experiences above. It will be a memorable journey for everyone. Hopefully the above will help you feel all the beauty of a place you must not miss when traveling to Da Nang - Hoi An with Incredible Asia Journeys.

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When is the best time to visit Hoi An?

When is the best time to visit Hoi An?

Hoi An is one of the most attractive destinations in Vietnam which welcomes millions of tourists coming every year. It was once one of the most famous port towns in Vietnam and Asia which drew the attention of a number of foreign traders coming from different countries such as China, Japan, Portugal, the Netherland, etc. especially during the 15-17th century. During this period, a lot of sophisticated architectures were built which reflected different cultures and many of them remained till today. Thanks to that, Hoi An was recognized as the UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1999. So if you are planning a visit to Hoi An, you may wonder when is the best time to visit Hoi An? The answer will be found in this article as well as some major tourist attractions and local signatures will also be listed. What’s the weather like in Hoi An? Weather in Hoi An Hoi An has an average temperature of 29 Celsius degree which is quite hot. The weather here has 2 distinct seasons: dry and wet. The dry season starts from January to July. You can see a lot of sunshine during these months. The weather at the beginning of the period is very comfortable, not so hot, not so cold. The wet season starts from August to December. During this time, you may expect a lot of rains, even floods or typhoons, especially in the month of November and December. The best time to visit Hoi An For most people, the period from February to April is the best time to visit Hoi An as the weather at this time is very pleasant, it’s cool and not rainy so you can take part in a lot of outdoor activities. For this reason, a vast number of tourists flood to Hoi An during February, March, and April. Hoi An Ancient Town From May to August, temperatures go up pretty high which may make you feel a bit tired when walking on the ancient streets. However, if you come here during these months, going to the beach would be the best as Hoi An has many beautiful beaches. From October to December, rains come quite often which will disturb your travel experience to this beautiful city. Thus, prepare a raincoat or umbrella with you. However, to make the most of it, the local people had created a new form of travel experience which is boating on the water during the rainy season. This experience will make your trip memorable and interesting. How to go to Hoi An from Da Nang? As Hoi An is located only 18 kilometers away from Da Nang city , there are a variety of options for you to transport between these 2 destinations. Our experts have put together some of the most common choices for you here: By car Many transportation service companies offer cars of any sizes from Da Nang to Hoi An. This is the most convenient option for you as it’s time-saving. However, it’s also the most expensive choice as it costs around 350,000vnd/ 4-seater car/ way. However, if you travel in a group, you can share this cost, then it turns out only around 100,000vnd/person. To book a car, you can either ask your hotel’s staff to arrange it for you or just book via Grab – a common app in Southeast Asia to book taxis or motorbike ride at a reasonable price. By bus If you are budget travelers, the bus might be your top choice. The bus number 1 linked Da Nang and Hoi An directly which costs only 30,000vnd/ way/ person. Its operation hours are only from 5:30 to 18:00, so don’t miss the last bus of the day. This option will take you around 30 minutes to arrive Hoi An. By motorbike Motorbike is also a good pick, especially for solo travelers. If going by motorbike, it’s very convenient as you can stop anywhere you want and it’s inexpensive anyway. You can rent a motorbike from Da Nang which costs from 100,000 – 150,000vnd/day excluding petrol. What are the best things to do in Hoi An? Get a tailored-suit made Tailor-suit in Hoi An Hoi An is well-known for suit making as you can find a vast number of tailor stores along the ancient streets. This city is also famous across Vietnam for its textile. Coming here, you can have an extremely beautiful tailor-made suit with an incredibly inexpensive price (about over 1 million dongs). However, you may need to wait for about 3 days to a week to get your costume. Make sure to ask for the exact date that you can pick it up. Wander around the Old Town Hoi An Old Town Hoi An ancient town is really worth a visit. Coming here, you can see a number of ancient houses built for more than 100 years ago. Walking along the old streets, you will see the different architecture, especially Chinese and Japanese as many foreign businessmen had come to Hoi An to trade. Materials to build the houses are also traditional ones such as wood, brick. This area is preserved quite carefully as you see all the stores are well-organized and no buildings are higher than 2 floors. One thing that you may love about this ancient town is that the streets here are very safe to walk as the traffic is as busy as modern cities such as Hanoi or Ho Chi Minh City. Discover the Japanese Covered Bridge Japanese Bridge The Japanese Bridge, also known as Pagoda Bridge, is one of the iconic symbols of this ancient town which is situated in the city center. This bridge was built in the 17th century with Japanese architectural style which is clearly shown by statues of 2 sacred animals in Japanese culture (dog and monkey) put on the 2 sides of the bridge. The reason why it is called Pagoda Bridge is that there is a small temple on the north of the bridge which worships Tran Vo Bac De – the Deity of Weather in Taoism. This is the place that local people often come to pray for the good weather. Visit the My Son Ruins My Son Ruins My Son is a UNESCO World Heritage Site situated 40 kilometers away from Hoi An. It is a Hindu Sanctuary found by a French scholar in 1898 which was dedicated to Hindu goddesses, especially Shiva – the protector of the Champa’s kings. It has more than 70 structures since the 7th -13th century which was the most important political center of Champa people. One of the special things about My Son Ruins is that all the sophisticated pictures were carved directly into the wall by skillful artisans. With its historical depth, My Son ruins definitely worth a visit. So if you come to Hoi An, don’t forget to take a day tour to this special site. Admire the Fujian Assembly Hal Fujian Assembly Hall This is a communal house of the Fujian community in Hoi An which was erected since the 17th century. Originally, it was a small wooden shrine dedicated to Queen of the Heaven – the Goddess of Ocean, Wealthiness, Happiness, and it was also a place where the Fujian people met and discuss occasionally. Over time, the shrine went to several renovations which transformed it into a bigger brick hall as today. Thanks to its beautiful architecture as well as historical value, Fujian Assembly Hall was recognized as the national historical-cultural relic in February 1990. How many days to spend in Hoi An? Our experts recommend that it’s best to stay in Hoi An at least 2 days 1 night as you can have a chance to enjoy the beauty of this ancient port town in the evening. If you have more time, you can stay up to 4 or 5 days because there are a lot of things to see in Hoi An, especially if you are history lovers. Besides all the things we have suggested you above, Hoi An also has other modern attractions such as Vinpearl, Hoi An memory show, or natural places such as An Bang beach, Coconut forest, etc. Thus, the more you stay, the more you enjoy Hoi An. We have advised you the best time to visit Hoi An ancient town as well as all the best things to do in this beautiful destination. To discover Hoi An, you can go by yourself or book a guided tour which can give you a detailed explanation about this place. See some Hoi An tours provided by our company: Hoi An Half Day Agricultural Tour Hoi An Rural Villages Half Day Cycling Tour Hoi An Cooking Class Hoi An Culinary River Cruise Hoi An Eco Tour Hoi An Half-Day Walking Tour

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How Long to Spend in Hoi An

How Long to Spend in Hoi An

In 1999, UNESCO officially recognized the town of Hoi An as a World Heritage site. It was the layers of gradually accrued history that brought them here, and a culmination of the food culture, architecture and beautiful atmosphere of the ancient port town that helped Vietnam receive its third UNESCO designation. Since then, tourism has markedly increased in Hoi An and now it is one of the must-see destinations in the country. With all of its various activities in and around the town, along with the strong appeal of sitting down and taking it all in from a coffee stand on the pavement, it can be quite difficult to know how long to spend in Hoi An. The town certainly has a unique atmosphere that demands proper appreciation over the course of a few days, but how long overall? In Hoi An, time has a more languid pace, as the ancient roots of the city stand frozen, lain out for all to see in its architecture and historical attractions. With this in mind, Incredible Asia Journeys is here to take a look at how many days you should commit to Hoi An.Hoi An Ancient TownHow Long to Spend in Hoi AnTo get a full feel for Hoi An’s time requirements, we will need to look at some of the various attractions that keep the influx of tourists sufficiently high.• Architecture – The tiled roofs that sit atop timber frame buildings and walls of rain-stripped yellow plaster are the iconic image of Hoi An. The influences from Chinese, Japanese, Western and other cultures can be seen throughout the town in its residential houses, shops, markets and tailors, while entire Chinese structures exist in the form of exceptionally well-preserved assembly halls used for meeting and worshipping.• Shopping – It’s no secret that Hoi An is a shopper’s paradise now; not for any large mega malls capitalising on tourist money, but for traditional items such as clothes, art and leather, handmade and sold within the town. The tailors are definitely one of the biggest draws for people looking for a bargain, and their preparation times will affect how long you eventually stay in Hoi An.• Cooking and Eating – A visit to Hoi An isn’t complete without trying many of the culinary delights to be found here. Cao lau and mi quang are two of the most popular dishes, both inspired in some way, as most of Hoi an is, by outside influences in Asia and Europe. Cooking classes can reveal some of the hushed secrets of Hoi An’s food, explaining from start to finish the preparation, cooking and even eating techniques employed by the chefs of the town.Cao Lau Hoi An• History – Over 400 years of history saw Hoi An rise from uninspiring backwater to one of the most prolific port towns in the world’s most populated continent. Hoi An’s remarkable rise, and eventual fall brought about by French colonialists deciding that Da Nang was the future of modern trading, can be seen throughout the town. Its return descent back into ‘backwater’ status can be read on the walls of charmingly disheveled buildings, standing this way for 200 years, now containing a new breath of life as gorgeous tourist attractions.• Nature -  Hoi An is generally a very flat land, which creates the perfect conditions for jade rice paddies, farms, orchards and quaint village paths that run between them all. Aside from farming villages like Tra Que and Cam Thanh, visitors can see a lush coconut forest in Bay Mau, beautiful rocky outcrops at the Marble Mountains, stretching beaches that hug the coast and idyllic islands floating in the East Vietnam Sea.

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8 Things to Eat in Hoi An – Culinary Perfection in Vietnam’s Cultural Capital

8 Things to Eat in Hoi An – Culinary Perfection in Vietnam’s Cultural Capital

There’s a tendency among tourists to think that the food culture in Hoi An is somehow diminished when compared to other Vietnamese cities because of the huge levels of foreign visitors that come here. Because of Hoi An’s long and active history as a vital port town on the maritime Silk Road, several different cultures have sailed in and out of the town for centuries, gradually leaving marks in the cultural make-up of the city through adding houses, religious buildings, bridges and ultimately, delicious food.You will find no shortage of things to eat in Hoi An as the town wears its culinary heart on its sleeves, with middle-aged chefs operating carts on the street, enticing you in with smiles and the attractive smells of their cooking. At even the most high-end restaurants, Hoi An’s food retains its humble roots and offers many chances to discover these around the town. At Incredible Asia Journeys, we’ve compiled this list of 8 things to eat in Hoi An.Cao Lầu (“cow low”)Legends abound about cao lau, its origins and its practices that are entrenched into the streets of Hoi An. Claims to the original throne of Cao Lau come from China and Japan; the noodles feel very Japanese and the stir-fried pork give a distinctly Chinese flavor, but as Hoi An was a melting pot of different cultures and their traders, its hardly surprising that this is reflected in a bowl of cao lau. What is for sure is that cao lau is now unquestionably Vietnamese through the additions of herbs, bean sprouts and flecks of rice cracker, and any visitor can see that it is now one of the most popular things to eat in Hoi An. The famous myth is that the water necessary to cook it needs to come from Ba Le well within the town, but given that thousands of bowls of cao lau are made every day and there’s never a queue at the well, we’ll take this one with a pinch of salt; not that cao lau needs any.Where to eat cao lau in Hoi An?Being Hoi An’s regional dish and one that is difficult to find outside of the town, it’s fair to say that you’ll never be stuck for options here. Most restaurants on the street will be able to accommodate for your cao lau lust, but you can head to Cao Lau Khong Gian Xanh (687 Hai Bà Trưng) for assured quality at the street price.Mì Quảng (“mee kwang”)Of the two most popular dishes to eat in Hoi An, you can immediately tell the difference between cao lau and mi quang with one quick sniff. It has more of a seafood aroma than cao lau as it makes use of Hoi An’s abundant waterways in its rivers, estuaries and ocean. Mi quang is the culmination of years of fishing tradition, from a time when seafood dominated the port town’s culinary catalog. Ingredients from further afield have made this less of the case, but it’s done nothing to diminish the delectable taste of mi quang and its colorful makeup of pork, shrimp, shallots, noodles, banana blossoms, coriander and red chili in a pork broth.Where to eat mi quang in Hoi An?Again, you’ll be blessed with a similar choice to that of cao lau when it comes to finding mi quang in Hoi An. Try Mi Quang Ong Hai – Mr. Hai Noodles (6A, Trương Minh Lượng) for a filling, delicious and local experience.Bún Đậu Mắm Tôm (“bun dough mam tome”)If you are yet to try the literal basket of food that makes up bun dau mam tom, Hoi An is a good place to give it a go. The shallow circular tray is iconic of this dish, but you’ll be able to smell it long before you get a chance to see it. It takes a hardy Western nose to break through the pungency of the accompanying mam tom sauce, a paste made of crushed and fermented shrimps, but it’s one of the big lunchtime players of Vietnamese food nationwide and certainly worth a go for a local experience. It contains several cubes (yes, cubes) of noodles which are dipped in the sauce, along with cuts of assorted meat, tofu, and various leafy vegetables.Where to eat bun dau mam tom in Hoi An?You should be able to smell the shrimp paste from a few streets over, but don’t let that put you off; try Quan Dau Bac – Bun Dau Mam Tom (38 Đào Duy Từ) and ask for soy sauce instead of mam tom if the scent proves too much.Cơm Gà (“cerm ga”)It might be hard to imagine how the simplicity of chicken and rice repeatedly makes it onto lists of unmissable things to eat in Hoi An, but centuries of this cheap, hearty meal fueling the traders and crew have put it firmly on the culinary map of the town. Just as Hoi An’s simplicity is its charm, such is the case with com ga, a mixture of not much more than rice, shredded chicken, pickled vegetables and a dipping sauce. It is the spice of the latter that gives this dish a kick, and it makes it one of the spicier things to eat in Hoi An, a town usually noted for its milder spice levels due to the influx of westerners who struggle to handle the heat.Where to eat com ga in Hoi An?The basic nature of this dish has naturally given rise to many variations that you can find around town, and the best of these can be found at Long Com Ga – Long Chicken Rice (53/16 Phan Chau Trinh), which caters for the Western palette with less gristly cuts of chicken.Sò Điệp (“sar dee-ep”)Another fine example of Hoi An using its fruitful waters to good effect, so diep, or grilled scallops in English, are among the most decadent things to eat in Hoi An, due to the melting effect that happens when they come into contact with your tongue. Topped with peanut oil, crushed peanuts, and spring onions, these scallops have an element of crunch to counteract the almost drinkable scallop meat. Where to eat so diep in Hoi An? Look out for the piles of scallop shells falling off of plastic tables, subject to the same treatment of discarding waste on the floor of restaurants that is standard practice in Vietnam. One slightly fancier eatery (by which we mean they have table covers) is Purple Lantern Restaurant, which still stays true to its Vietnamese roots by being pretty hard to find. It is located on one of the unnamed roads around An Bang Beach, so it’s best just to look on a map. Bánh Bao Bánh Vạc (“ban b-ow ban vack”)More commonly known as ‘White Rose’, this is certainly one of Hoi An’s more Instagram-friendly things to eat. It’s quite easy to see why the French colonialists gave it such a name; white rice paper is cooked while a piece of shrimp lies in a parcel inside, meaning the edges of the paper bunch and rise up around the center to create the appearance of a flower. Toasted garlic is then grated on top and green coriander and red chili are added for color. 15 little dumplings appear to be the standard issue here, all of which require dipping in the accompanying chili sauce.Where to eat banh bao banh vac in Hoi An?It is common knowledge around Hoi An that, allegedly, one family makes the entire of the town’s supply of white rose and distributes them from their own kitchen and accompanying restaurant, White Rose Restaurant (533 Hai Ba Trung). Whether this is true or just a fantastic marketing ploy, us mortals will never know but check out the apparent home of white rose in Hoi An is worth a go, otherwise you can check out Ms Ly Café (22 Nguyen Hue) to determine if there’s any difference.Hoành Thánh Chiên (“Hwine Tine Chee-en”)These fried wontons are one of the things to eat in Hoi An while looking for a more comprehensive dinner. Served as a pre-dinner snack, these small, crispy samosas are full of ground pork, shrimp, scallions, garlic and vegetables that are dipped into a sweet and sour sauce, an obvious relic of Chinese visitors to Hoi An but now one adapted to the Vietnamese palette. The shape of the wontons is really at the discretion of the chef, and you might find them served to you in triangles, rolls, parcels or tiny teardrop shapes that resemble the water on your face after you finish your last bite.Where to eat hoanh thanh chien in Hoi An?The vast menu at Morning Glory Restaurant (106 Nguyen Thai Hoc) lists hoanh thanh chien as a starter or a side, but no one will judge you for making a full meal of six or seven plates.Bánh Đập (“ban derp”)The rural surrounds of Hoi An are homes to the farms, vegetable gardens and fruit orchards that feed the town. One such place is Cam Nam island on the other side of the Thu Bon River, which specializes in rice crackers, another of Hoi An’s things to eat before meal time. Banh dap are two layers of crispy and wet crackers that are joined together and require smashing on the table in order to bring them down to a size that you can fit in your mouth. At the base level, the smashed fragments of banh dap are just vessels for the accompanying anchovy sauce, but some other varieties, including hến xúc bánh tráng (clam crackers) and chè bắp (sweet corn crackers), provide more flavor in and of themselves.Where to eat banh dap in Hoi An?Take the trip south across the Cam Nam Bridge to Cam Nam Island, the far south of which is where all of the banh dap eateries are. Try any of the shops here, such as Quán Bánh Đập Hến Trộn Cao Lầu Hôi An (Nguyen Chi Phuong Street), which have been serving locals rather than tourists for a very long time.

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Shopping in Hoi An – What to Buy in Vietnam’s City of Lanterns

Shopping in Hoi An – What to Buy in Vietnam’s City of Lanterns

Hoi An was never made for shopping, but it certainly feels like it is now. The UNESCO World Heritage site lying in the middle of Vietnam was built on a history of trading, born of its advantageous position along the maritime Silk Road. The walls of Hoi An are dripping with history (and a ridiculous amount of rainwater in the wet season) and a building can barely be entered without stepping into a world of a hundred different stories, through maritime, personal and now, retail ventures.The incredible modern shopping scene of Hoi An grew out of the wealth accrued by traders, who plunged their money into the finer things in life, such as tailored clothes, art, and jewelry. The fruits of these ventures are seen today in Hoi An, sitting underneath swinging lanterns and blue skies, waiting for the discerning traveler to find a bargain within their walls. Shopping in Hoi An is now an unmissable experience in Vietnam, one that has garnered worldwide acclaim. Here at Incredible Asia Journeys, we have picked eight of the most fantastic and unique products to take home for yourself or gift to anyone unlucky enough not to be able to make it to this gorgeous and historic town.Hoi An SilkTailored ClothesWe’ll start with the obvious here. Despite a history built on maritime trade, Hoi An nowadays is more popular for the tailors that claim to be able to produce any item of clothing you want. The incredibly low prices ensure a steady flow of business from tourists who want to stock up on their 8th or 9th suit before returning home, where they can expect to pay up to tenfold for a very similar item. Most of the town’s tailors are far from the common Asian idea of cheap knock-offs, using a great deal of skill taught over generations that has formed the backbone of Hoi An’s shopping scene.Though suits are a very popular item for backpackers on a gap year before their accountancy internship starts up, really anything that you can think of can be made by Hoi An’s artisan tailors. Simply show them a picture, wait patiently while every corner of your being is measured, select your material and color and sit back for one or two days while the magicians do their thing. If you use a reputable tailor, you can expect a near-perfect replica for a fraction of the price.Tuong Silk TailorWhere to shop in Hoi An for tailored clothes? Where not to shop should be the question. The staggering amount of choice of tailored clothes shops in Hoi An can overshadow the beauty of the town, as competition for customers is fierce and sometimes verbally intimidating. Picking one of the respected tailors might give you a slightly higher price tag, but the increase in quality and the attentive but relaxed service you will receive is worth the price. Head to Tuong Tailor (67 Tran Hung Dao, +84 235 3863 573) or B’Lan Silk (23 Tran Phu Street, +84 510 386 1866) for reasonable prices and a complete absence of pushy service.Ethnic Minority ProductsFor the most wholesome of Hoi An shopping experiences, head to some of the shops specializing in selling ethnic minority clothing and products that usually don’t make it to mainstream society. It seems a waste to confine the beautiful colors and geometric patterns of Vietnam’s 54 ethnic minorities’ clothing to the rural enclaves in which they were lovingly and arduously stitched. Hoi An is branching out into new avenues, and now tourists can buy clothing that will certainly set them apart from the crowd.The vivid colors of the various H’mong tribes who reside in the north of the country are well represented here. The rainbow of colorful, patterned dresses and headscarves feature in the photos of so many travelers to Sapa, and they now have a market in Hoi An thanks to shops like.Village Craft Planet in Hoi AnWhere to shop in Hoi An for ethnic minority products? As mentioned above, VillageCraft Planet (59 Phan Boi Chau, +84 909 696 578) is a fantastic service that puts respect and fair trade at the forefront of their business philosophy. They sell everything from clothes and shoes to furnishings and jewelry, all at a reasonable price that goes a surprisingly long way to helping hill tribes around the country with low incomes.Tuong MasksIt’s hard to think of a better place to buy one of Vietnam’s most culture-soaked products than in its capital of culture. The history of Tuong masks stretches back over 1000 years and its origins, like many other forms of traditional entertainment like water puppetry, are found in the rice fields. After a successful harvest, villagers would don elaborate and colorful masks (or sit still for upwards of 8 hours while a professional painstakingly painted one onto their face) and entertain the villagers with singing and scandalous storylines, known as Tuong Opera.Of course, Tuong is a very rare form of art in today’s modern world, but Hoi An’s shopping scene has a small corner devoted to keeping the tradition alive. Though delicate and requiring a lot of care in getting home, these brazen and bold masks make a wonderful gift or a fantastic way to scare your kids into doing their homework.Tuong MasksWhere to shop in Hoi An for Tuong masks? The fantastic staff at The Timing Masks Workshop (66 Bach Dang, +84 235 3959 159) are warm, patient and passionate when taking you through the history of some of the huge array of masks on offer. The owner, Phong Bui, offers workshops that are a great way for kids and adults to learn of a charming piece of Vietnamese history.ArtIt is a mix of Hoi An’s beautifully evocative streets and its history of wealthy residents and art patrons that make it the best place to find fantastic art throughout the country. The classical, finely-painted Vietnamese scenes sit alongside more contemporary offerings in the galleries and art shops of Hoi An, meaning you will be spoiled for choice amidst centuries of artistic culture. Smaller pieces are obviously easier to transport home, so small ink-paintings on traditional do paper are among some of the more popular things to buy in Hoi An.Art Gallery in Hoi AnWhere to shop in Hoi An for art? Given the wealth of choice on offer, there is certainly not one specific place to satisfy your artistic sensibilities. Check out Gallery Dung (93B Phan Chau Trinh) for incredibly intricate ink paintings and postcards for cheap, while 155 Art Gallery (155 Tran Phu Street) provides those idyllic Hoi An motifs of palm trees, bicycles, and ancient house life. Phu Tam Photography (99 Nguyen Thai Hoc) is a great place to buy stunning photos by an internationally acclaimed artist, while Art House Vietnam Gallery (692 Hai Ba Trung) is the mecca for Vietnam’s contemporary artists, who sell their experimental pieces within its walls.LanternsIt shouldn’t take you more than one try to guess how Hoi An earned its moniker of the ‘City of Lanterns’. Any riverside stroll at night will be accompanied by the beautiful, calming light of hundreds of lanterns that has been present in Hoi An for centuries, lighting the late-night activities of tradesmen and sailors to the port town. Most tourists become rightfully enraptured by the lanterns and decide to buy several to take home and, if not for restricted luggage space and the delicate manner of the lanterns, they would probably bleed Hoi An dry, such is the love for one of Vietnam’s most beautiful decorations.Lantern Shop in Hoi AnWhere to shop in Hoi An for lanterns?You can resist the urge to steal the lanterns hanging outside of shops; buying lanterns in Hoi An is very easy and very affordable. The shops aren’t hard to spot either, just look out for the collective blinding glow of hundreds of lanterns hanging in one small area. Places like Dé Lantana Silk Lantern & Lamp (35 Ly Thai To, +84 510 6288 789) offer a range beyond your imagination, with plain lanterns sitting alongside incredibly extravagant ones, all for a price that won’t break the bank.Leather ProductsNot far from the world of personally tailored clothing is one of similar depth – leather. A walk down the streets of Hoi An is sure to be one flanked by leather bags hanging outside of doors, enticing potential tourists in with their sleek, smart look that will accompany your new suit most delightfully. Aside from the typical bags, shopping around Hoi An a bit will reveal a whole world of other products such as shoes, notebooks, belts and watch straps. Quality varies wildly between a lot of these shops as a void in supply has harbored the standard cheap products tended by overly-pushy staff. Many of them will be all-too-quick to pull out their lighters and torch their products in a bid to show you that the leather is real. Though it might be, the handiwork might be shoddy and the quality of the leather might just be one tiny step above flammable.Leather productsWhere to shop in Hoi An for leather products?Friendly Shoe Shop (18 Tran Phu, +84 935 211 382) have certainly done their research into what tourists want, as their big pull is the unassertive service that you’ll receive while perusing the shoes here. Along with this is their genuine top quality, one that is matched quite comfortably by Tu-Chi Leather Shop (24 Duong Phan Boi Chau, +84 905 216 515), who have a wider range of leather goods available.Kim Bong Wooden ArtOn the island of Cam Kim in Hoi An, you will find a village with a strong woodworking heritage, where wooden figurines, statues and furniture pile up in houses, awaiting shipment around the center of Vietnam. Kim Bong is the name of the village and it’s accessible on several day tours from Hoi An. The artisans of Kim Bong are experienced in the art of shell inlay, used to create incredible scenes with an iridescent beauty on wooden platforms. Once shells are selected, they are cut into various shapes and glued into fitted holes in a circular piece of wood before being polished. The result is a stunning piece of art, full of Vietnamese motifs and made of nothing but natural materials.Kim Bong wood art in Hoi AnWhere to shop in Hoi An for Kim Bong wooden art?Heading straight to the source is really the best thing you can do here for the most authentic product. While there are bound to be several knock-offs, the craftsmanship that goes into a piece of wooden art from Kim Bong is monumental and should be fairly easy to recognize at first glance. A stroll or cycle around Kim Bong will open up the world of shell inlay for you.JewelryOstentatious jewelry historically lay at the heart of the good life for Vietnam’s richest merchants in Hoi An. Huge incomes from successful trading were transferred into items of gold, diamond, and pearl, worn enthusiastically by the elite to display their wealth. Things are different now, of course, and Hoi An’s many jewelers are open to the general public, offering quality items for cheaper than you may find them elsewhere. Following the modern traditions of Hoi An, shopping for jewelry is a tailored experience. Simply show your picture to the goldsmith and await the results.Lotus Jewelry ShopWhere to shop in Hoi An for Jewellery?This is one of the highest-risk ventures in Hoi An because of how hard it is for the untrained eye to tell the quality of precious metals. There are many trustworthy shops, however, if you know where to look. Try Bien Bac Jewellery Shop (55 Hoang Dieu Street, +84 5103 862 353) or Bac Viet Quality Jewelry (10 Pham Hong Thai Street, +84 905 550 062) for pendants, necklaces, rings, bracelets and beyond that can be tailored to your specifications at a fraction of the international price.

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10 Best Things to do in Hoi An

10 Best Things to do in Hoi An

There’s a stigma around one of Vietnam’s premier tourist attractions, one that designates the humble village of Hoi An as nothing more than a tourist trap. In reality, though the numbers of tourists in Hoi An are huge in amount (1.5 million in 2022), their presence is never overwhelming and the true cultural beauty of Hoi An speaks louder than its critics. Hoi An’s position on the East coast of Vietnam is one that has brought it both mercantile prosperity and the constant threat, and occasional execution, of colonisation from Japan, China, France, Portugal and The Netherlands. Such occupations, along with modern tourism, have bestowed Hoi An with an international flavour through its temples, bridges, old trade houses, food and nightlife. The possibilities for exploration of this ancient trade town are massive and it would not be unreasonable to allot about a week to see everything of worth. At Incredible Asia Journeys, we have condensed the considerable list of Hoi An’s top attractions to a more manageable number. So, here are our 10 best things to do in Hoi An. Hoi An Ancient Tower at night 10 Best things to do in Hoian 1. Invest in an Old Town Pass In a bid to fight off disrepair of ancient buildings that are regularly hit by tropical cyclones, monsoons, floods and even lightning, Hoi An’s governing body introduced the Old Town Pass, a small fee that tourists pay to visit the oldest section of this ancient town with its many, many historical and cultural sites. At just 120,000 VND ($5.25 USD), foreign tourists can explore 5 of the 22 listed attractions available, while domestic tourists pay 80,000 VND ($3.50 USD) for 3 attractions. While this means that a lot of Hoi An’s attractions will go undiscovered, you can prioritize your trip to visit one of each of the 5 categories to get a good feel for Hoi An and its multicultural history. Japanese Covered Bridge in Hoi An - One of the top things to do in Hoi An has always been to visit the Japanese Covered Bridge, a small, attractive 16th-century construction by the occupants of the time. The bridge has been renovated numerous times and now belongs to an attraction category all of its own. - As far as old family houses go, the 200-year-old house of Tan Ky is certainly one of Hoi An’s best, with a typically beautiful interior and exterior along with evidence of a long history of trading and devastating flooding available to view within. - Phuc Kien was built in 1757 and is the oldest assembly hall in Hoi An. This was a place of business for the traders of Hoi An and the incredibly ornate buildings and courtyards of Phuc Kien demonstrate the affluence of people in this line of work. - For museums, you can’t go wrong with the Museum of Trade Ceramics, which takes visitors through some of Hoi An’s earliest exports and the journeys such products embarked on around Asia and the Middle-East. - The Handicraft Workshop is an interesting look at the history and current practice of Vietnamese crafts such as toys, porcelain and jewellery. You can see the artisans working so you can be sure of their products’ authenticity. 2. Get on your Bike While the Old Town Pass is good for learning of the history of the town, for learning of the current culture and lifestyle of Hoi An’s residents, the best thing to do is rent a bicycle and take to the countryside roads. Many day trips from Hoi An can be done on a bicycle and these are a great way to the all-too-often unexplored surroundings. It’s easy to get enraptured by the magic of central Hoi An, but the town is fringed by beautiful countryside, rugged marshland and those highly sought-after golden views of far-stretching rice paddies. You can try a tour such as Heaven and Earth, which has great excursions to tiny craft workshops that otherwise would have remained a mystery. If group tours aren’t your thing, then you can rent a bicycle in a very cheap and very trusting way from random vendors in central Hoi An. Biking in Hoi An 3. Get Lazy at the Beach Consistently making travellers’ lists of the top reasons to visit Hoi An are its delightful beaches that are pressed against the East Vietnam Sea. Cua Dai and An Bang beaches are the two big names in this category and as a result, both draw big crowds of domestic and foreign tourists to find tranquillity from the bustling town on the palm tree-lined white sand. Unfortunately, they don’t always find it, as these beaches can get just as crowded as the streets in the town on a nice day.  If the Hoi An Weather is playing ball, you should head instead to the aptly named ‘Hidden Beach’, a small section of sandy coastline to the north-west of Cua Dai. Here, the Lam family runs a restaurant and bar, and buying something to eat or drink from them helps the family stave off the approach of big hotels looking to commercialise one of Hoi An’s best-kept secrets. Cua Dai Beach 4. Loosen those Purse Strings The vivacity of trade that ran through the veins of Hoi An in its past is still alive today, albeit contained on land now. It’s no secret that Hoi An is a shopaholic’s dream; the tailors here are among the best in the world and the wealth of options when it comes to personalised clothing is staggering. The competition for business in Hoi An, especially during its quieter season, can spell great deals for tourists with a knack for bargaining. As a major port of call on the famous Silk Road, the tailors of Hoi An have had centuries to perfect their craft, and if you can find a reputable business such as A Dong Silk, then a quality product at an astoundingly low price is definitely within your reach. A Dong Silk Tailors 5. Savour the Local Delicacies Of the Vietnamese cuisine famous throughout the world, not much has originated in Hoi An. However, its current position as an international destination has meant that many Vietnamese and universal classics have been borrowed from around the country and abroad, finding a new life and new flavour here. This is the case with dishes like phở, bánh mì, and wonton noodles, reflecting the melded influences of Vietnamese, French and Chinese in its make-up.  Popular dishes coming from Hoi An don’t enjoy the same international acclaim, but they are decidedly tasty, which is really the main thing. A trip to Hoi An can’t be complete without a meal of Cao Lau, a delicious but incredibly laborious dish that requires water from a certain well and vegetables from a certain farm outside the town. A plate of wonderful bánh bao bánh vạc (or ‘white rose’) would go well afterwards; these dumplings have secretive interiors that no chef is willing to reveal exactly. This can be finished off with a bowl of xí mà, a viscous, black dessert with the appearance of tar but the flavour of sweet pennywort. Cao Lau in Hoi An 6. Revel in the Buzz of the Town at Night Once the sun has settled behind the Thu Bon River, the ornately colorful lanterns hanging above the streets turn on and Hoi An’s fantastic nightlife begins. Of course, the bars and nightclubs of Hoi An are fairly recent inventions built to reap the rewards of the backpacker market. You won’t find a deeply cultural experience at any of the local bars in Hoi An, but you’ll find a fervent, international crowd in good spirits. Most bars have a home on An Hoi island, directly next to the Thu Bon River as well as the heart of Hoi An’s backpacker hostels. Here you can find the famous Tiger Tiger Bar, as well as the copyright-disregarding Mr. Bean Bar and Moe’s Tavern. More upmarket bars are available in the form of White Marble, a quiet, sophisticated offering worthy of the overall aura of Hoi An, as well as Q Bar, a stylish cocktail bar with international appeal. Thu Bon River at night Check our best tours to discover Hoi An  7. Wind down with a Coffee amongst the Hubbub  Amid the frenetic whirlwind of tourism and trade, Hoi An can sometimes feel like a bit much to take in. With so much to do, most tourists see the UNESCO World Heritage site at breakneck speed, trying to cram a week’s worth of activities into 3 days. Despite its simplicity, one of the best things to in Hoi An is purely to sit down at a café and take it all in; the ladies walking with two baskets of merchandise resting via a plank of wood on their shoulders, the gentle swaying of floating lanterns between bright yellow shop fronts, the chaos of the marketplace as vendors joke with curious foreigners. A Vietnamese coffee is a perfect accompaniment for these sights and there is no shortage of places where you can get one amongst the ancient streets of this town, vibrant and extroverted in both appearance and attitude. Enjoy coffee in Hoi An 8. Bring in the new Lunar Month with Floating Lanterns Once a month in this increasingly international destination tradition takes over and the ancient practice of sending floating paper lanterns down the Thu Bon River becomes a ubiquitous sight along its banks. In actuality, the floating lanterns operate almost entirely in the realms of tourism, with locals preferring the traditional methods of ancestral worship through burning incense and making offers at the family alter. Nevertheless, the burning flames flickering inside paper lotuses is a magical sight, and one not to be missed when the Floating Lantern Festival comes to Hoi An on the night of every full moon throughout the year. This is one of the top things to do if you are visiting Hoi An with kids, as the enchanted scene is magnified tenfold in their eyes. Floating Lanterns Festival 9. Snorkel near Unblemished Beaches on the Cham Islands Matching the beauty of the mainland countryside, the Cham Islands are a picture of paradise. 18kms offshore, the Cham Islands are accessible via two ferry services; one sardine-like experience leaving at 8.30 am with the locals (100,000 VND, $4.50 USD) or the more spacious express boat leaving from Cua Dai Beach (220,000 VND, $10 USD). The two big draws of the islands are their collection of 4 beaches on Hon Lao Island, as well as the stunning marine park with clear waters and the opportunity to try diving and snorkeling. Cu Lao Cham (Cham Islands) The vast majority of people book day trips to the Cham Islands through tour companies and hotels in Hoi An, leaving little in the way of options for independent travellers. However, while getting around the islands is rather difficult, you can find homestays not far from the pier, such as Hammock Homestay, which feels like havens of serenity once the day-trippers have gotten the last ferry back to the mainland. For the picture-perfect scene of the sunset over the hidden beach of Bai Xep, staying overnight on the island is the only option, but one that is completely worth your time and effort. 10. Visit Vietnam Golden Bridge – Ba Na Hills Last but not least, one of the most famous tourist attractions in Da Nang – Hoi An is definitely the Ba Na Hills with the famous Golden Bridge - a magical, beautiful tourist destination. This is in the top list of things to do during your Vietnam Holiday Package.  This bridge has a unique architecture formed by 2 giant hands holding the bridge. Travelers from all around the world has come just to witness this incredible attraction. During your one day tour to Golden Bridge , you will visit a lot more attractions such as Debay Wine Cellar, Le Jardin D’Amour Flower Garden, French village and Fantasy Park. Vietnam Golden Bridge

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Best Time to Visit Hoi An

Best Time to Visit Hoi An

At this point, Hoi An Town in Vietnam needs a very little introduction; the tourism trade is booming here and has been for a while. Tourists come from far and wide to experience the magical atmosphere of Hoi An through its lanterns, tailors, river, food, festivities, beaches and general calm that runs throughout the heart of the UNESCO World Heritage-listed town.The list of reasons to visit Hoi An are numerous and only a stay of about 4 or 5 days is enough to get a true feel for the town, but the best time to visit Hoi An depends on exactly what you’re looking for. Between Hoi An’s weather fluctuations, the plethora of annual events on offer and your own, often tight, schedule, it can be confusing to pick one time that suits you. Here’s a quick look at the best months to head to Hoi An.Hoi An Ancient TownBest time to visit Hoi An for the good WeatherLocated around the tropical centre of Vietnam, Hoi An weather is notably warmer than the North and mildly cooler than the South. Its consistency is a big draw for tourists, who come every month to visit the wonders of Vietnam and always express massive interest in a Hoi An trip. The beauty of the town is largely outdoors, so weather is an important factor in the tourism boom that has gripped Hoi An for several years now.There are only 9 degrees of difference between the coldest month of December and the hottest of July. The average temperatures in winter of around 22 or 23 degrees still make for a comfortable time in the town, if maybe a little too chilly to head to Cua Dai Beach or a day trip from Hoi An. The main drawback of visiting Hoi An in November and December is the deluge of rain that is provided courtesy of the wet season. Nearly half of the days in these two months are expected to get rain, which often floods the river and turns the lower areas of Hoi An into vast outdoor swimming pools.Cua Dai Beach in Hoi AnBeach season is usually in February, March and April, all of which receive a very small amount of rain and good temperatures, making this, in most people’s opinions, the best time to visit Hoi An. This is peak season in a town that is struggling to cope with the tourism boom it finds itself in, bringing about higher prices for accommodation, tickets, clothing and souvenirs. If busy streets are not your thing then you might consider saving your trip until June, July and August, which bring hotter weather and higher humidity, but shoulder season prices and more space to relax.Check our best tours to Hoi An: Central Vietnam Holiday 5 Days, Essence of Vietnam 14 Day Tour, and Ultimate Vietnam Holiday 10 Days.Best Time to visit Hoi An for the Festivals Hoi An didn’t become a UNESCO World Heritage site by accident. The town features a huge amount of monthly and annual events that showcase Vietnamese culture both inside the region and throughout the country. In the space of a few years, Hoi An has found itself as an ambassador for Vietnam for the thousands of tourists that visit it daily during peak season. The best time to visit Hoi An for its iconic monthly lantern festivals coincides with the lunar calendar, as these festivals only happen on the eve of a full moon. There aren’t many experiences more magical than when Hoi An turns its lights off and tourists are invited to send illuminated lanterns floating down the river.Hoi An New Year FestivalThe Hoi An New Year Festival is held any time around late January or mid-February and is one of the most popular places to celebrate Vietnamese Tet in the country. The Festival usually happens amid almost ideal Hoi An weather in February, meaning that overcrowding in the town is not uncommon. Again, if you can deal with this then it is well worth a visit, but any claustrophobic tourists might want to aim for an October departure date to catch the much less busy Mid-Autumn Festival. This is a lively and colorful spectacle with dragon dances and traditional music spanning four days in mild, but often rainy weather.Shopping in Hoi AnThe tailors of Hoi An make a lot of money from tourists who come to get cheap, tailor-made clothes for themselves or as souvenirs. Shopping is high on the list of Hoi An’s appealing factors for tourists and it remains a popular activity throughout the year. However, your bargaining power fluctuates with the seasons; it’s harder to grab a great deal when the town is awash with tourists looking for the same service that you are. The time taken to produce your clothing is also lengthier if the tailors have several orders on at once, which means that saving the trip until the quieter months might be good if you’re strapped for cash or time.A lantern street in Hoi AnAs a general tip, shopping around the enormous selection of tailors or souvenir merchants in the town will help you lower the price. Vendors are totally reliant on tourism for business and should never be taken advantage of, but bargaining is normal in daily Vietnamese culture and it becomes a lot easier on rainy days or days in the off-peak months. While a visit to the indoor markets is also a good idea for the wet season, outdoor food markets tend to become very wet and chaotic; this is part of the charm of Vietnamese culture and should be experienced at least once.Read More: The best time to visit Saigon, The best time to visit Tam Coc, The best time to visit Halong Bay

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